Afghanistan

Dostum calls for united stance against Taliban rule

Abdul Rashid Dostum, the leader of the Junbish-e Milli Islami Afghanistan (National Islamic Movement of Afghanistan), has called upon his friends and associates to take a resolute stance against the Taliban’s rule.

Speaking at a memorial event commemorating the 22nd anniversary of the assassination of Ahmad Shah Massoud, various jihadist leaders, former government officials, and resistance leaders came together to discuss the current state of Afghanistan.

Dostum, known for his strong presence in Afghanistan’s politics, delivered a stern message, urging those in attendance to stand up against the Taliban’s authority.

I have firmly and seriously told my friends and associates to move forward with God’s hope,” he said.

The event also saw Ahmad Massoud, the leader of the “National Resistance Front,” address the audience.

Massoud appealed to all ethnic groups in Afghanistan to unite in order to address the prevailing challenges in the country.

He emphasized that without the establishment of a legitimate governing system in Afghanistan, the concerns of the global community would remain unaddressed.

“In the absence of such a system, any efforts, whether in combating terrorism, drug trafficking, advocating for women’s rights, or advancing education, will yield unsatisfactory results,” Massoud asserted.

Massoud also said that the Taliban has not cut ties with terrorist groups.

He called upon the international community to recognize a governing system that emerges from the will of the Afghan people, underscoring the importance of democratic processes.

Meanwhile, former President Hamid Karzai also paid tribute to Ahmad Shah Massoud, the national hero, writing in a Facebook post that Massoud dedicated his life to “the freedom and independence of Afghanistan.”

Abdullah Abdullah, the former chief executive of the republic government, also weighed in on the legacy of Ahmad Shah Massoud.

Ahmad Shah Massoud was assassinated by two Moroccan reporters just two days before the 9/11 attacks in the US.